Three Ways to Improve Your Quality Program in 2017

It’s still January and everyone is busy implementing goals for 2017. It’s not too late to take a good, long look at your contact center’s quality program with an eye to improving things this year. Here are three thoughts for taking your quality assessment (QA) to a new level.

Reevaluate the Scorecard

Most quality programs hinge on the quality of the criteria by which they measure performance. A few years ago there was a backlash against behavioral measurements (e.g. “Did the agent address the caller by name?”) as companies sought to avoid the calibration headaches and wrangling over definitions. The pendulum swung in true human nature to the opposite side of the continuum to become completely subjective. Multiple behaviors gave way to two or three esoteric questions such as, “Did the agent reflect the brand?”

This shift to the subjective is, of course, wrought with its own problems. You can forget about having any objective data with which to measure agent performance. If your analyst is Moonbeam Nirvana then you’ll get consistently positive evaluations complete with praise for what Moonbeam believes was your good intentions (and lots of smiley emoticons). If, on the other hand, your analyst is Gerhardt Gestapo then your performance will always fall short of the ideal and leave you feeling at risk of being written up.

Measuring performance does not have to be that difficult. First, consider what it is that you really desire to accomplish. Do you want to measure compliance or adherence to corporate or regulatory requirements? Do you want to drive customer satisfaction? Do you want to make agents feel better about themselves? Any of these can be an arguable position from which to develop criteria, but you should start with being honest about the goal. Most scorecards suffer from misunderstood and/or miscommunicated intention.

Next, be clear about what you want to hear from your agent in the conversation. Define it so that it can be easily understood, taught, and demonstrated.

Prioritizing is also important. While exhaustive measurement of the interaction can be beneficial, it is also time consuming and may not give you your bang for the investment of time and energy. If your priority is ad-on sales, then be honest about you intention of measuring it, define what you want to hear from your agents, then focus your analysts on listening for those priority items.

Look at Data for Both Agents and Analysts

One of the more frequently missed opportunities to keep your QA process on task is that of looking at the data of how your analysts actually measured the calls.

Years ago our team was the third party QA provider for several teams inside a global corporation while other internal teams managed the job for other locations. There was an initiative to create a hybrid approach that put the internal and external analysts together in sampling and measuring agents across all offices. When we ran the numbers to see how analysts were scoring, however, the internal analysts’ average results were consistently higher than the external analysts. Our analysis of analyst data provided the opportunity for some good conversations about the differences in how we were hearing and analyzing the same conversations.

Especially with larger quality operations in which many analysts measure a host of different agents and/or teams, the tracking of analyst data can provide you with critical insight. When performing audits of different QA programs, it is quite common for our team to find that analysts who happen to also be the team’s supervisor can be easily given to sacrifice objectivity in an effort to be “kind” to their agents (and make their team’s scores look a little better to the management team). Likewise, we have also seen instances where data reveal that one analyst is unusually harsh in their analysis of one particular agent (as evidenced in the deviation in scores compared to the mean). Upon digging into the reasons for the discrepancy it is discovered that there is some personality conflict or bad blood between the two. The analyst, perhaps unwittingly, is using their QA analysis to passive aggressively attack the agent.

If you’ve never done so, it might be an eye opener to simply run a report of last year’s QA data and sort by analyst. Look for disparities and deviations. The results could give you the blueprint you need to tighten up the objectivity of your entire program.

Free Yourself from Software Slavery

As a third party QA provider, our team is by necessity platform agnostic when it comes to the recording, playing and analyzing phone calls. We have used a veritable plethora of software solutions from the telephony “suites” of tech giants who run the industry like the Great and Powerful Oz to small programs coded for a client by some independent tech geek. They all have their positives and negatives.

Many call recording and QA software “suites” come with built in scoring and analysis tools. The programmers, however, had to create the framework by which you will analyze the calls and report the data. While some solutions are more flexible than others, I have yet to see one that gives one the flexibility truly desired. Most companies end up sacrificing their desire to measure, analyze, and/or report things a certain way because of the constraints inherent in the software. The amazing software that the sales person said was going to make things so easy now becomes an obstacle and a headache. Of course, the software provider will be happy to take more of your money to program a solution for you. I know of one company who, this past year, paid a big telephony vendor six figures to “program a solution” within their own software, only to watch them raise their hands in defeat and walk away (with the client’s money, of course).

Tech companies have, for years, sold companies on expensive promises that their software will do everything they want or need it to do. My experience is that very few, if any, of the companies who lay out the money for these solutions feel that the expensive promises are ever fully realized.

If your call data, analysis and reporting is not what you want it to be, and if you feel like you’re sacrificing data/reporting quality because the software “doesn’t do that,” then I suggest you consider liberating yourself. If the tool isn’t working, then find a way to utilize a different tool. What is it we want to know? How can we get to that information? What will allow us to crunch the numbers and create the reports we really want? Look into options for exporting all of the data out of your software suite and into a database or Excel type program that will allow you to sort and analyze data to get you the information you want and need. Our company has always used Excel (sometimes in conjunction with some other statistical software) because it’s faster, easier, more powerful and infinitely more flexible than any packaged QA software we’ve ever tested.

Continuous improvement is key to business success. Scrutinizing quality criteria, analyst data, and your software constraints are just three simple ways to take a step forward with your quality program. Here’s to making sure that we’re doing things better at the end of 2017 than we were doing at the start!

 

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