Making Allowances for New CSRs

 Many call centers struggle with how to handle new CSRs as it relates to quality assessment. There is more and more pressure to get CSRs out of training and on the floor. The result is that CSRs are often taking calls before they are fully knowledgeable and there’s going to be a period of time when they struggle to deliver a level of service expected by the QA scorecard. So, what do you do?
First, you always want to be objective. Communicate the QA standard or expectation and score it accordingly. If they missed an element – mark it down. If it’s on the form then you should always score it appropriately.
The customer doesn’t care that the CSR is new – they have the same expectations no matter who picks up the phone. Giving the CSR credit and simply “coaching” her on it will ultimately do a disservice to everyone involved. It tends to undermine the objectivity, validity and credibility of the QA program.
To sum it up, let your “yes be yes” and your “no be no.” It does, however, make sense to give new agents a nesting period to get up to speed. Rather than dumbing down the scale or pretending that they delivered better service than they actually did, it makes more sense to me to have a grace period. Some call centers will have a graduated performance expectation (e.g. by 60 days your QA scores have to average 85 by 90 days they have to be at 90, etc.). Other call centers will allow new CSRs to drop a set number of QA evaluations from their permanent record to account for the outliers that frequently occur (e.g. “We expect you to perform at an average QA score of 95. I realize that newbie mistakes cost you on this evaluation, but over the first 90 days you get to drop the lowest three QA scores from your permanent record, so this may be one of three). Either one of these strategies allow you to make allowance for rookie mistakes without having to sacrifice your objectivity.

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